I am so excited to share Cade and Jennifer Wyatt’ family’s cotton session with you!!  I babysat Jennifer for a summer when she was in kindergarten and I was a teenager and we’ve been friends since then!  I loved getting to spend time with her precious kiddos – Saylor, Olivia and Iris.

 

 

I am honored the above photo of Saylor was featured as a Weekly Favorite on The Snap Society’s  Instagram and blog.  See the blog post here!!  I have always loved little cowboys!  🙂

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Oh I loved spending time with Miss Emily!  She was so fun to photograph!  She is the daughter of Cam & Jennifer Washington.

I’ve had a few people asking me about how I do newborn photography.  So I decided to share  some of the information that I send to parents.

1.) AGE:  I like to photograph newborns between 7-10 days after birth.  Honestly, if a baby is older than 14 days, I usually turn them down.  Why?  Because the older the baby gets, the harder it is to get them to sleep and cooperate.  It’s really not worth the fight for me to take pictures of an “older” newborn.  Taking newborn pictures can be exhausting physically.  I like to compare newborn photography to hot yoga – there is a lot of sweating, bending and stretching.

The best way to schedule y0ur newborn session is while you are pregnant!  My calendar stays pretty full – especially in the spring and fall.  I typically will schedule the session 7 days after they are born.  I want to make sure the mommas have a few days to recover, but the babies still be nice and sleepy.

3.) Full Belly – I always tell the parents to keep the baby awake for 2 hours before the session and then have the baby fed right before they come for their session.   I am sure it’s challenging to keep them awake for those two hours, but it is crucial for a successful newborn session.

While I have done a few newborns while they are awake, I prefer to have them sleeping.  Why?  Is there anything sweeter than a sleeping baby?!  Plus, it is impossible to control newborns while they are awake – you can’t bribe them to smile or look at the camera, you can’t entertain them, and they are usually moving their hands and feet, making it hard to keep them in a flattering position.

4.) Noise – I have a White Noise App on my phone and I usually have some type of music playing.

5.) Plenty of Time – Allow for 2-3 hours. These sessions take time and patience and really should not be rushed. It takes time to soothe the baby, feed the baby, pose the baby, wrap the baby, switch blankets, clean up messes, etc. It sounds like a long time but you’d be amazed how quickly it goes by.

Newborns are, by far, the hardest to photograph.  I have spent hours taking webinars and courses online to learn how to safely pose the babies.

5.) Props, Wraps & Clothes – Less is More!: I have a basket and wooden box, newborn wraps and some blankets, that I have available for every session.  I try to buy a new wrap or prop after every couple of newborn sessions.  I encourage parents not to bring a bunch of outfits that are hard to get off and on.  The less we have to change and disturb the baby the better chances we have of getting good pictures.

Thank you so much to everyone who has brought their babies to me!  I have loved having the chance to love on these babies!  If you know of someone who is expecting a baby this year, send them link to this blog post so they can be educated on newborn photography.

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